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Let's talk about gastronomy. What people eat in your setting? Cereals? Meat? Fruits and vegetables? Seasonings? Beverage? Desserts? How available, expensive or prestigious are the food sources? How much the eating habits may vary depending of culture and race? Is there some kind of exotic or unusual source of food? By that I mean, perhaps cultivation of edible, luminescent fungi among subterranean races or unique types of fish and seaweed with strange properties known only by the merfolk. Maybe even food with dangerous supernatural effects, like those offered by the fey.
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>>52911245
>Troll steak
No matter how much you bite it, it quickly regrows to the original size, making it a theoretically infinite source of sustenance. Even when prepared well done, it regenerates to its raw state over time. The only caveat? It's completely indigestible by most creatures, as it keeps regenerating as stomach juices attempt to dissolve it. Troll meat can only be eaten together with special herbal pills that neutralise regeneration. Unfortunately, these pills are rather unhealthy, as their overconsumption also inhibits the natural regeneration of those who eat them.
As for the taste, it tastes like frog.

>Lunarshine
A unique elven drink that is made by filtering moonlight through a long series of curiously shaped lenses, some of which have geometrically impossible shapes and are produced through magical glassblowing. The lenses solidify moonlight and turn it into a fluid that looks like fluorescent sparkling quicksilver. The taste and properties of the drink depend on the phase of the moon during which it was produced. Young moon lunarshine is sweet and works like an energy drink, while old moon lunarshine is bitter and has hallucinogenic properties. It is prohibited to produce it during the full moon, as the consumption of full moon lunarshine can cause lycanthropy.

>Deep porridge
This is an unappetising looking dark brown, highly viscous paste that occurs naturally deep underground. Although similar to mud both in consistence and in appearance, it is in fact edible and tastes like salted licorice. While certainly an acquired taste, it's almost addicting to those used to it. Dwarven experts agree that it most likely has the same origin as fossil fuels. It's widely used as a source of sustenance by miners and sometimes even exported to the surface. Deep porridge is the most mineral-rich food in existence, with 1 kilo containing a monthly dosage of minerals. Overconsumption can lead to adverse effects such as crystals sprouting from the skin.
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>>52913006
Wouldn't the fire from cooking it keep the steak from regenerating at all?
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>>52913100
Troll vulnerability to fire is what allows to cook it in the first place, but, one it's out of the fire, the regeneration comes back in full swing. As long as you don't turn the steak into a piece of coal, it will regenerate from what little soft tissue is left there.
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>>52911245
>Elf pussy lips
Tasty, can be either kept as a jerky-like traveling snack or a highly-priced delicacy served raw. Elves are farmed and the women have their labia removed at the age of prime length and tenderness.
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>>52913256
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>>52913291
More pussy lips for me then.
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>>52913006
this is fucking amazing
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Razor beaks are albatross sized birds with spear like beaks that they use to impale creatures. Massive wire nets are cast to collect entire flocks of them when they start to harass settlements and shipping lines. They are commonly cooked in a curry sauce or roasted whole.

> I made curried turkey legs for my players the other day to simulate. They were amazing!
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>>52913529
I hope you enjoy playing games surrounded by fart clouds
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>>52913006
>Lunarshine
That actually sounds like a neat little thing, especially from the phases of the moons. What would the effects be for other lunar activities, like eclipses or blue moons?
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>Giant Suke Fish

A rather common fish around the setting's equivalent of Eastern Europe. They're so big, that instead of fishing for them normally, brave fishermen hunt them like whales, harpoons and all. While they are known to destroy boats, the risk is well worth it, as the flesh of the giant fish has a much prized texture and taste, and the sheer size means one can both feed many people and bring plenty of money to the fisherman's family.
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>>52911245
>Dawimon's Hang
Huge human sized cocoon shaped fruits that list downwards from the low hanging branches of bitterest of winter forest canopies, bearing a light brown colouration with green blotches on its skin, looking somewhat similar to a hanging tree branch, the blocky hide can be split and the pseudosolid, flammable, gelatinous flesh can be eaten straight out of the fruit, the flavour is sharp, spicy, and if eaten alone, often distasteful, however their huge size and warming flesh makes them boons for arctic explorers.
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>>52911245
Is there any actual cookbook with recipes for fantasy dishes?
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Imp's eyes. They look just like guaran√° fruits (pic related, hence the name), grow in medium sized, thorny shrubs that can be found anywhere near lakes and rivers. Its small, vibrantly yellow flowers bloom twice a year, for two weeks, make an excellent condiment when grinded and sprinkled on meat and broths, and can be used as a potent soporific in infusions. They also help to relief pain.

The fruits get fully ripe soon after the blooming, and "open their eyes". The flavour is bitter, but extremely alcoholic, and because of that highly valued as the main ingredient of a popular beverage. Five of them are enough to completely intoxicate a grown man. Children like to stealthily feed them to horses and see the results when their owners come back...

Druids consider them sacred to their serpent-headed goddess and ritualisticaly consume them in the form of a drink prepared with seven different kinds of herbs and the urine of the high druid while in the form of a humanoid snake. During the ceremony, weird, unstable magical effects tend to happen. They might get wrapped in an aura of wild glory, receive prophetic visions while in a state of trance, and sometimes the goddess herself might manifest through her gathered followers, connecting their spirits and minds while turning them into dancing, glowing lights rising up to the sky.
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>>52916512
There's one about hobbits eating habits, apparently.
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>>52917246
>consume them in the form of a drink prepared with seven different kinds of herbs and the urine of the high druid
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>>52914511
Sounds like a good challenge. I like the puffer whales for different reasons. They are the epitome of decadent luxury and ostentation.
>its taste is so delicious that it has an endless deliciousness factor, with an enormous taste and an endless bliss that remains even after consuming the meat
>the meat and organs possess a high concentration of nutrients and energy. If eaten raw, a person can work days in a row without sleep
>it has an extremely potent nerve poison in a sack in its body which is all the wastes and poisons in its body compressed into a sack. Each puffer whale has a unique poison sack location. They are extremely sensitive as the slightest touch can break the sack. When the sack is broken, the entire fish is poisoned becoming a deep purple color. However the poison does not affect its taste, which is why it is sold on the black market when available
>countless people have disregarded their life to eat a poisoned puffer whale, dying in the process
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>>52918398
I read somewhere that urine actually used to be ritualistic ingested with herbs and mushrooms by European shamans during the Neolithic period and the Iron Age, in order to enter in a trance and reach the gods.
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>>52918645
Puffer whales? Ha, no. Suke, Blyat.
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>>52914511
Also, Colossal "Black Hole" Whales. The oldest ones can reach the size of countries. Although rather passive, they nonchalantly consume hundreds of prey and large volumes of water, absorbing all matter and even light with extreme ease into their titanic mouths. The entire region it resides in becomes a bottomless abyss completely devoid of light, further enhancing its resemblance to a Black Hole. Everything it consumes goes to type of Dirac Sea, a vacuum-like pocket dimension, from which there is no escape.
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>>52913006
I like the deep porridge one.
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>>52911245
You know what, a little off-topic, but it fits. Fa/tg/uys, I'm hungry, someone pick a snack for me and I'll give it a review.
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>>52919997
Fresh pear
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I only let my players eat chicken nugger.
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>>52919997
Order D7.
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>>52914231
Seconding this.
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>>52920332
>D7
>not superior F5
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>>52919331
This thing is unholy and should be purged from existence.
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>>52914231
Eclipse: makes you blind on drinking it
Harvest moon: works as an aphrodisiac
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>>52920464
Shit, you're right. You get more for the same price.
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>>52918965
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>>52913100

Or stomach acid for that matter?
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>>52921520
Do you have acid in your colon?
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>>52921567
There's acid in shit.
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Whenever I can, I try to think of a unique food item for each town, or at least a unique spin on something common. Like the Elf's Nose, in Wourick, which has its speciality of Tailypo soup. Supposedly, it's made from the tail of a strange beast that lives out in the forests nearby. I won't type out the whole tale here cos it's pretty long and you can use Google, but simply put: this hunter is looking for something to eat, and can't find anything. The sun is setting, and as he's heading home, a terrifying creature jumps out of the trees and pounces at him. Out of instinct, the hunter swings his axe, and manages to cut off the tail of this beast, which sends the beast screeching off into the woods.
The hunter thinks "fuck it, might as well eat this tail", so makes it into a soup. That night, the beast breaks into his land, eerily crying in its voice unlike any man's "Tailypo... tailypo... Give me back my tailypo!"
When the hunter explains that he ate it, the beast goes off the hook and destroys the entire house. The only thing that remained was one table, and on that table, one last bowl of steaming hot Tailypo soup... and some say that the Tailypo beast will come find whoever tastes the last drop of his tailypo...

Anyhoo soup's here, eat up.
In reality, it's just standard potato and leek soup. The nice plants out around the inn are various herbs and spices that most people wouldn't recognise
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>>52914231
Since eclipses don't shed light from the moon it instead distills a instant soberent.
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>Firemelon
A plump red and black striped gourd filled with soft pulp that instantly ignites on contact with air and can sustain burning for many hours. These fruits evolved to have autoigniting pulp to protect their seeds from wild animals. Consequently, firemelon cannot be eaten unless injected with a special herbal extract that neutralises autoignition before slicing it up. In spite of the danger inherent in handling it, firemelon is very popular thanks to it sweet and spicy pulp. Apart from its culinary usage, it's very popular amongst arsonists and commonly used by orcish armies in sieges.

>Chrondiment
A mixture of several potent spices that is aged for several years in hourglasses before usage. Any dish spiced with it attains a unique property known as priortaste, which is like aftertaste, except you feel it prior to consuming the dish. This property made chrondiment of gourmet restaurants the world over. However, as it often happens with exotic food, consuming it is not entirely safe. Abuse of chrondiment can lead to a number of time-related disorders, such as talking backwards, spontaneous slowdowns or even the groundhog syndrome.

>Celestial jelly
An extremely delicate souffle made from magically solidified clouds. Its taste and texture depend on the type of cloud it was made from. Cumulus jelly tastes like vanilla and is similar to chewing candy, while stratus jelly is similar to cotton candy and tastes like menthol. The most priced type of celestial jelly is made from thunder clouds, it's got a blue cheese taste and gives a jolt of energy, but its procurement is very risky. Since the spells for creating celestial jelly are rather simple, it's a very popular snack for airship sailors and mountaineers.
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>>52928941
>firemelon
that's....interesting. How do the seeds normally get to soil? Does the fruit just slowly decay until the pulp ceases to autoignite, or is it SUPPOSED to ignite for the seeds to really get going?
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>>52928941
Firemelon?
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>>52929715
The seeds are fireproof, the fire produced by the firemelon isn't hot enough to really hurt them.

>>52929833
The firemelon pun is way too obvious to think that I'm the first one to come up with it.
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>>52929715
There are certain trees whose seeds have to go through a fire before they'll germinate, so I imagine it's similar.
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>>52930619
that was precisely why I was asking.

>>52929715
If the firemelons are left completely untouched by animals, they don't get very far from the tree and the plant can't spread.
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>Basilisk's Tongue
A type of pepper that when raw or improperly cooked has causes hallucinations and paralysis, an effect that isn't always unwelcome. When cooked it has a tangy flavor and causes a pleasant numbness. Considered a delicacy.
>stone lettuce
The leaves in a head of stone lettuce are tightly compressed, causing a similar density to solid rock. When cut and allowed to unfurl a head can easily expand to four times its size. They're commonly preserved in vinegar as rations for travelers and in a pinch can be used to bludgeon someone.
>Dwarf bread
Never goes bad, but becomes progressively harder as time goes on. When freshly baked it's soft and fluffy, and by the end of the day it becomes hard and crunchy. Few people are willing to eat it after two weeks and after a month it's best served chiseled into crumbs. Several loafs from decades ago are still in existence and many would-be inventors are trying to find a way to forge them into arms and armor.
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>>52930822
I dunno, chilli peppers do spread their seeds somehow, even though animals don't eat them for a similar reason
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>>52930822
Maybe if they're left to ripen for too long they explode, scattering the seeds everywhere.

Naturally, they taste the most delicious right before they explode.
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>>52928941
>>52931004
at any rate, I'll take Firemelon and Stone Lettuce, thanks.
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>>52931004
>Several loafs from decades ago are still in existence and many would-be inventors are trying to find a way to forge them into arms and armor.
This is really cool, I like it!
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>>52916512
Anne McCaffrey's Serve It Forth. Closest I can think of, since I own it.
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Sad Potato: exactly the same as a common potato, except it's fully sentient, fears death and feels pain, although it has no way of expressing it. Spends its entire life in deep melancholy, fantasizing about its inevitable demise. So far, no botanists have discovered the difference between sad potatoes and ordinary potatoes.
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>>52934570
>So far, no botanists have discovered the difference between sad potatoes and ordinary potatoes.
How do they know they exist, then?
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>>52934740
God told them
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>>52934740
After a great feast, a psion came after he felt a great disturbance in the Noosphere, as if millions of voices suddenly cried out in terror, and were suddenly silenced.
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>>52911245
There's a list of infredients for every region, I'll list just what might be exotic in /tg/'s eyes:

>kavajan green cake, made from honey and mate herb flour.

>manitari pie uses a whole giant mushroom instead of dough to fill with duck eggs and herbs.

>Kosinbians eat termites, popcorn and giant-elands.

>dwarfs use lead and powdered dry bat wings as condiments.

>Hobgoblins make an yellowy cheese with the crop milk of dinosaurs, put to dry in the sun.

>Spices from the desert elves' faerie oasis are glamoured. The same leaf can look, smell and taste different to two people.

>Devil's drink is destilled from potatoes, sugar beets and whatever else was close at hand. Red pepper is added to the resulting samogon. Bar owners always say that "the smell alone endangers your soul" and tradition demands the drink be consumed aflame, straight from the bucket it was sold into.
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>>52934740
Nobody knows, and this makes the sad potatoes even sadder.
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>>52935483
>dwarfs use lead and powdered dry bat wings as condiments
I suppose dwarfs don't enjoy living very much,
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>>52916512
Leaves from the Inn of the Last Home.
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>>52911245
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While Wood Elves of the Sibian Forest typically enjoy a simple diet of fruits and nuts, the meat of other races that enroach upon their territory has its place in a culinary tradition going back for as long as they have called the forests their home.
Prime meat taken from a slain Halfling (a foolhardy messenger from a foreign land unaware of the dangers trespassing on Wood Elf land presents) is thinly sliced and marinated in shredded mango and lime leaves then fried in seed oil. The rendered fat serves as the base for a meat stew cooked in a clay pot, where root spices and coconut milk help soften the tougher cuts of meat.
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>>52914231
For decades it was thought drinking the lunarshine from an eclipse was poisonous, but it turns out the elf that taste tested it hates the taste of black licorice and had flair for the dramatic.
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Human footsoldiers of the Great Castellan Empire subsist on meagre rations of stale bread, smoked fish and a mildly alcoholic brew called yohrta. The drink is made from citrus fruits fermented in a specific bacterial culture that provides a long-lasting source of vitamins suitable for trail rations.

Soldiers that move through the town of Goulcrest are treated to a special beverage to alleviate them from the monotony of such rations. Luminous jellyfish sourced from the nearby underwater caves have their tentacles and bell seperated. The bell is boiled into a foul-tasting stock and then discarded and the stock used for luminscent dyes.
The tentacles however are soaked in milk, which takes on a deep irridescense as the venom leeches out. The tentacles are removed and the colourful milk sweetened with honey and fruit.
The drink is slightly hallucinogenic and renowned for the sense of euphoria and relaxation it provides- helped in no small part by its lurid, otherworldy colour and the glowing clothes of the bar staff that serve it.
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>>52937389
Lead was a real* condiment, dry bat wing powder still is. A cook I know says it is "rancid without being unpleasant".

*https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lead(II)_acetate#Uses
I made dwarf races more resistante to metal poisoning: iron, silver, lead etc.
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>>52937764
>gorgonzola separate from blue cheese
Wanna know how I found out this chart is shit?
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Orc and Goblin "cuisine" is little more than fuel for the great blind, headless war machine that is the Northern Steppe tribes. The flesh of wild goats and horses (and enemies) is eaten raw and usually fresh from the source, while root vegetables and tubers are cooked in primitive mud-and-charcoal ovens.
More war ritual of the Snakefang tribe than culinary tradition, the soup known as sag'rut is prepared by the tribe's medicine women after battle and consumed before the next. Live prisoners taken from the defeated tribe or army are hung upside-down from a tree branch or wooden gallows and have their throat slit, the blood being collected in the hollowed-out skulls of the Snakefang's dead warriors -of which there are many.
The skulls are bound in leather and left out in the sun long enough for the blood to turn rancid. The Snakefangs takes their sag'rut with them and before heading into battle the tribe's warriors each drink a skullfull in an act that pays respects to the fallen and blesses them for the fight ahead.
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>>52938491
I'm actually a little disappointed it didn't rustle more jimmies. Oh well.
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Amongst the Hill Dwarves of Bezierbon the miners enjoy a hearty nutritious breakfast that has gained renown throughout civillised culture. Dwarved constitution is strong, but for the long hours and hard work of gold mining in the Atlarean mountains a tremendous amount of energy is needed throughout the day.
Known as simply the Bezier breakfast: eggs, sausages, bacon, slices of assorted cave mushrooms, smoked peaches, sweet potato, carrot and onion are fried with lard in a wide heavy-based cast iron pan and served with corn, blackberry jam and mountain-hog cheese- another famous Bezierbon delicacy.
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>>52928941
>>52929715
pic related

>>52931033
Birds aren't affected by the capsaicin. You could easily have some fantasy equivalent.
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>>52939038
where's the metamelon and woomelon?
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>>52919331

The worst part is that you said WHALES rather than whale. Fuck.

What happens when two meet?
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In the rich hinterlands of Poyasie hides the small Halfling village of Black Hollow. The locals lead simple, humble lives when it comes to food- porridge, bread, stews made from local mutton and vegetables and a roast chicken every Sunday for the well-to-do.
The same cannot be said of their drinking habits. Black Hollow is home just one of a network of secret Halfling wineries, breweries and distilleries that trade amongst themselves so that every Halfling has the chance to enjoy the finer things in life.
Thick black stout, rich red wine from the Hameny valley, tangy, sweet and acidic cider, peaty burnt-oak whiskey. While these are just some of any number of alcohol consumed on an average Tuesday afternoon, Black Hollow itself is responsible for Lyeflower gin.
Mash sourced from 18 different grains is distilled into alcohol and flavoured with various berries, fruit peels, herbs, beetle wings, seeds, spices, nuts, flowers, sap and burnt woodchips.
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>>52938565

Here's the other half
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What would you eat in an underdark or any big subterranean ecosystem?
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>>52939542
Funghi, lichen, moss, mould, giant insects, cavewater fish, worms, crabs, rockmoles, giant underground bat meat.
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>>52939542

It all depends on the bottom trophic level of the ecosystem. Where does energy come into the system?

Photosynthesis isn't an option. You could have energy from animals that migrate from the surface. Alternatively something like the deep ocean, from thermal chemical vents adding energy and nutrients. Anything else would have to depend on some magical inputs.
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spikeron

looks like a large pear, with a thick, leathery peel that got several large, intimidating spikes on it, aswell as a "main spike" underneath it, large enough for it to plant itself into the ground when it falls from the trees it grows from. the size of the fruit is relative to the age of the tree, and thus, old wild trees can produce fruit the size of pumpkins. even "middle-aged" trees can produce fruit the size of bowling balls and whose windfall can kill a person. it tastes like something inbetween some kind of melon and a lychee, but with a slightly stringy texture. it is quite common for villagers to go out and forage for dropped fruit, to turn it into booze due to it's high sugar conent, but many has lost their lives doing this.
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>>52940062
that gives me an idea. I don't suppose you had other ideas for the name of this fruit?
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>>52939542

A time I was traveling on the highway alone and was bored and started daydreaming. The day before, for no reasons in particular, I checked about japanese cuisine and it seemed that traditional cuisine in fancy hotels is divided into kaiseki/tempura/teppanyaki/sushi.

What if traditional underdak cuisine is separated in how you use fire, which is something you clearly should use with caution?

a) steamed/deep fried "on the rocks" food. By which I mean what at least originally were volcanic rocks, or in general steam currents and whatnot (todays dwarves can redirect these efficiently). Kinda of a novelty, probably once some kind of festival food.
Mostly meats and mushrooms.

b) actual fire. Of course this is usually for surface things. Even more occasional, I'd say. Smoking would pretty common as well, 'cause you want food that could be consumed innacaves.

c) Fermentation and whatnot. Perhaps the most typical in the underdark; I dare to say it's the most common way of preparing food, the one even a poor family can afford.
The love of dwarves from alcool stems from here; lichens and moss are the most common, as well as of course mushrooms (which can be used to grow on OTHER food to spice things a bit). I guess it's something incredibly complex, every cave would have its "cheese".

d) live/raw. Think about it: if there is a place were sushi would be a given, it's deep water caves. Possibly what outsiders are more disgusted at first sight, but still. On this subject I can see smaller caves used only for giant insects, you feed them, you take them. Could become dangerous if you don't know what to expect

>it's worth mentiong >>52939607 list which sounds good me kind lacks carbs. Senshi wouldn't be amused, what would be the underdark's bread?
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>>52940618
well, yes. Not a lot of raw carbs or fats in the tunnels. Best bet would be if giant insects had fat deposits for consumption.

underlife would definitely lean more towards mineral and nutrient heavy diets relative to calories, simply due to what's available. It's harder to regulate heat, so overconsumption of carbs is less popular.
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>>52940014

I always tought the actual underdark (not your goblin cave innawoods, I mean REALLY deep down) runs like a more complex versions of black smokers or anyway some kind of vulcanic-based ecosystem. What I'm not sure how to explain is why you have your plants equivalent kinda everywhere, apparently, not concentrated on where the heat or the minerals come through.

>>52940719

>no fat and carbs innacaves

This is scientifically sensible but an insult to everything dwarf-y. We need to find a workaround

>to be fair I always visualized dwarves as some kind of amphibian people in a sense, using the INSIDE of the mountains as well as the OUTSIDE, from which the could get, I dunno, barley and cow cheese, but still
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>>52939226
The smaller one gets vored.
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>>52919997
ruffles
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The Haazo beast (imagine a creature that's 1/4 chinese dragon, 1/4 goat and 1/2 ostritch) vomits a sugary sweet/sour syrup which people use as a condiment with bread, crepes, to glaze ham and on gingerbread. Everyone knows what it is, but doesn't want to admit they literally eat animal puke
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>>52941309
So it goes into the pocket dimension of the bigger one, and starts eating everything in there? Including smaller black hole whales?
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>>52911245
I've been tinkering with materials collection in my games, while going light on the direct treasure. One of the areas that this has taken off massively is with food.

>Soup
Soup is the absolute king of campfire food, because you can make it with anything, you can make a ton of it, and you can store it easily too. The party has made soup out of absolutely fucking everything. Even when they run out of stock or "standard" ingredients, they'll just use water and various fauna and flora- once quite literally pulling a "stone soup" and adding a rock on the dwarf's behest, along with some lichen, wild leek and roots, and some mushrooms. Didn't end up tasting very good, but it was hearty and healthy as all hell, kept for like a week. Usually I grant benefits for meals in general, and that particular soup granted a small portion of HP for a full meal. (Potions and the like were nigh impossible to come across in large quantities, it was up to food and other things you'd actually find in a town. Mid-fight heal options were crazy valuable.)

>Meats, cheeses, breads
The complement to soups, and just as common. Usually, cheese and bread was determined more by what town the players visited than anything, as each village/city/town had its own spread, while meat could be picked up mid-dungeon if they needed it. Dry-rub + spitroast was the most common cooking method, though it was far from the only method.

>Seasonings
Actually massively important. Spices were the most expensive item anywhere you went, formed the bulk of treasures found or collected in a dungeon, and had different worth depending on how "exotic" they were in a town. They also frequently drastically improved and added to what bonuses food gave, especially when used correctly, so the party was also incentivized to keep it.

At one point they even sold spiced monster jerky in a port town to help pay for a safe voyage across the sea.
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>>52913006
Reminds me of that one greentext in a similar thread about the "Troll bite". Basically it was a nugget of troll meat with the regeneration factor alchemically slowed based on the consumer. It lasts for a month, and basically regenerates at the same pace in which you digest it. You can't eat anything or drink anything other than water, but it feeds you for a month before you have to regurgitate it. Neat stuff.
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>>52942664
reminds me of MGS nanomachines
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>>52928941
>Chrondiment
Naturally distilled thiotimoline! Fuck yeah!
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>>52930822
>can't spread
Anon, they would operate like the sunflowers in the Known Space universe; instead of reflecting sunlight off them to burn everything around and slowly grow massive areas of nothing but sunflowers, the melons would eventually pop, catch fire to the surrounding plants, and slowly grow massive areas of nothing but firemelons.
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>>52939038
>elemelons
>not melementons
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>>52942821
The problem is self-competition.

Unless they explode like >>52931402 mentions, they're so close to the parent plant that they're still in its root network. Animals won't carry the seeds to farther destinations, and wind can't push something that heavy.
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>not downing beasts like Tarasques and making them into sushi
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>>52942963
I frankly want to know what kind of monstrous seaweed and rice can support those body bits without getting crushed.
>>
The setting for my current D&D campaign has a few races who have their own food preferences.

Dwarves are known for cooking garla goat. Garla goat meat is very tough, has a strong garlic scent and flavor (dwarves cook with a lot of garlic in general) but stays fresh longer than regular goat or beef. Garla goat jerky is also popular snack among travelers.

Brave tritons will sometimes steal and cook goose eggs. Most tritons drool at the thought of a nice breakfast of fluffy rice, fried goose eggs, and fresh fruit.

Gnomes are vegetarian in my setting, but boy do they grow some good shit. Hearty vegetable soups to fill your belly, and an herbal tea to soothe your mind.

Elves love sweet and spicy things. Spicy roast boar is usually followed by sugary Elf-ice (like simple popsicles, but they don't melt from non-magical heat). They also love sweet fruits, especially citrus fruits.
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>>52919997
>no gummies
Shit.
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>>52939318
>eating humanoid monsters
That's fucked up
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>>52939542
With the amount of different bacteria and fungi, I'm sure fermented food and blue cheeses would be firm staples of underground cuisine.
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>>52944386
>Elf-ice (like simple popsicles, but they don't melt from non-magical heat)

how do you eat it then
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>>52940618
>it's worth mentiong >>52939607 list which sounds good me kind lacks carbs. Senshi wouldn't be amused, what would be the underdark's bread?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treacle_mining
>>
>>52939607
>>52940014
Considering an underdark is quite fantastic already, I don't think it's unreasonable to add truly fantasy fauna and flora. Classical things may include:
> Worm of various size that somehow eat rocks
> Giant moles
> Giant mushrooms that grow without rhymes or reasons.
> Phosphorescent fungi because adventurers must be able to see shit from time to time.
Strangely, I could see luminous flora making some sort of sense. Considering there may not be wind to carry spores away some plants may want to attract animals to disperse their seeds by zoochory. Though light could also be a repellent in such an environment... Flashbang plant!

>>52940882
>I always visualized dwarves as some kind of amphibian people in a sense, using the INSIDE of the mountains as well as the OUTSIDE
I do the same, classic under the mountain keep, more cosmopolitan trade towns at the mountains foot, and mountain valleys for farming. A classic dwarf surface fortification is to "close" a valley entry, so everything behind is relatively safe for farming. Or secret high plateau that are hard to reach from the outside.
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>>52911245
>What people eat in your setting?
Dicks... lots and lots of dicks
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>>52948370
...Golarion?
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>>52914511
Makes me think of River Monsters
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>>52945813
maybe stomach acids still dissolve it?
>>
>Cotton Candle
A roman candle-like stick made from an enchanted alchemical substance that produces a small cloud of magical flame on ignition. This flame is of much lower temperature and higher density than normal fire and can be eaten like cotton candy. As long as the stick is burning, the fire regenerates. While it's merely moderately hot to the touch and tastes like chilli, it gives a prolonged feeling of pleasant warmth in the stomach. A source of light, warmth and sustenance, cotton candles are extremely popular with miners and cave explorers. However, overconsumption of edible fire can lead to spontaneous combustions.

>Soldier's Brick
A famous goblin snack used for prolonged expeditions. Made by collecting microbial mats from the shores of salty lakes, drying them out and pressing the resulting mass into blocks. One such block can famously last over a month, chiefly because a normal person would rather stay hungry than eat this thing. For this reason, it is very popular as a standard army ration, which gave it its popular name. But the usefulness of soldier's bricks doesn't end here. When set on fire, they create a cloud of unbearable stench, helping to keep the wild animals away from the camp. It's also hard and heavy enough to crack an enemy's skull when used as an improvised weapon. Generally, most specialists agree that soldier's brick is more useful as anything else than it is as food.

>Food for Thought
Most unusual in both its look and appearance, this dish is in fact a book enchanted with magic. The passages of this book describe in great detail a certain dish, from its ingredients down to the nuances of its taste. While reading this book, one actually feels this taste in his mouth and begins feeling satiation. By the time he finishes the book, he should be full. The book can be re-read any number of times, with the same effect. Every material used to make this book, from the pages to the ink, is edible, so the book can be eaten traditionally as well.
>>
>>52940173
It sounds like a durian almost, just not stinky and probably sweeter.
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>>52951392
Durian is so absurd it could be a fantasy fruit by itself. Do you have fantasy food in your countries?
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>>52946851

And some kind of seasonal nomadism. Winter inside, summer outside. Cattle included.
(it's funny how IRL mountain people used to have problems just because they had to stay there in the winter, strange as it sounds)

Some hipster dorfs actually invented skiing, maybe. Can see that.

>flashbang plant stolen ASAP

On this subject, the thread made me think about this.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sxrk8_wTu2I

If I do centaurs as muh not!mongol steppe people, or anyway nomadic...

What do they eat? Grass like horses is retarded, but at the same time milk and cheese from cattle/sheep sounds strangely mundane, at least to me. Or... hrm, how can I say, inefficient? You design an intelligent species to go like an horse but it's not really adapted to grass plains?
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>>52951493
>Do you have fantasy food in your countries?
Unironically meatbread.
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>>52952519
>Grass like horses is retarded
Well I immediately disagree.
Make them eat roots if you're such a pussy.
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>>52951493
Maggot cheese. Wasn't there a klingon dish like this?
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>>52952519
>If I do centaurs as muh not!mongol steppe people, or anyway nomadic...
>What do they eat?

Hunter gatherers. The question is what lives in your fantasy steppes?
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>>52945732
If they don't want to be eaten, they should stop being so delicious.
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>>52949385
Bigger than that. These fish are quite literally the size of small whales.
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>>52952822

Problem is that eating half-bent is pretty retarded.
(vegetables, for sure, Centorea there is already mostly vegetarian, makes sense)

>>52952920

Yeah but I dunno, I feel it's kinda cheap to make them eat basically like humans. I dunno, half human food half... something else?
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>>52939607

Cave tubers which is plucked like grapes. The tubers make for decent starches or just for brewing
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>>52952860
EVERYTHING the klingons eat is alive or raw. Octopuses and targ hearts and the like. You're probably thinking of bloodworms or racht, which are living heaps of small or big worms, respectively.
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>>52911245
The village the players live in and defend as they explore the country sustains itself on a pretty varied diet where they live, in a divine jungle. It's mostly all pearl eggs, boar pork, edible mosses, the occasional salvaged canned goods, small game, tons of foraged fruits and safe vegetation they've identified, river fish, local ocean fish, celestial coffee, and they're growing their own small farm for some grains and variety.
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>>52953552
Gagh is worms too. Even klingons don't like the taste of it, they just eat it because of the feel of the worms wiggling around.
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>>52938565
>julienned worms
>aren't julienned
>grilled enoki mushrooms
>aren't enoki mushrooms
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>>52911245
Plump helmets. Lots and lots of plump helmets.
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>>52953435
Who mentioned eating half-bent?
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>>52953853

Nah, the worms don't have the skin.

>>52954360
>>52954360

Grass is lower than a centaur's mouth.
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>>52954383
Strawberries grow on the ground, I suppose you lie down to eat them?
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No food thread is complete without the man, my man, Demonbread
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>>52911245
This is my biggest fear, because it would make the group realize I don't know anything about beer or food in general. I don't want them to find out I have never actually cook or drink alcohol in my life.

>inb4 underage
I'm 26 and live a comfy life with my single mom, I don't need to cook.
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>>52954509

Humans are kinda made for this, can't see centaurs doint that much.

Think I'll go with higher bushes, not really edible for humans, but staple of a centaur's diet. Plus normal goat milk/hunting/whatever.
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>>52941437
yall need Jesus
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>>52950164
>Food for Thought
does that actually give them nutrition?
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>>52955505
What happens when your mom dies anon?
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>>52956489
Sell the rights to Sonichu to Disney
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>>52955505
>26
>live with my mom
>comfy
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>>52911245

Lemony lemony lemon cakes.
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>>52955505
LOOOOSER!
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OH FUCK A FOOD THREAD IS ABOUT TO DIE SHIT NO
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>>52952646
I'd love to get one of those stuffed with some spinach and cheese.
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>>52956009
Sure, otherwise what kind of food is that?
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>>52913006
Unless you cook it. Hope you like your steak fucking BLOODY (Which you should, anything more than medium rare is just a chuck roast cooked into leather)
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>>52962689
well, where is the nutrition coming from?
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>>52963009
The same place where the taste and fulfilment are coming from.
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>>52934570
this might be the most pointless fluff piece I've read on /tg/ in the entirety of my time here, it's honestly kinda amazing
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>>52963027
light fantasy.

I do not comprehend.
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>>52963080
Well I don't know what else to say then mate, I frankly think it's as self-explanatory as can be
>>
>>52942414
>Soup is the absolute king of campfire food, because you can make it with anything, you can make a ton of it, and you can store it easily too.
Soup generally takes a long time to make(because you not only have to cook the ingredients, you also have to heat a lot of water which, in case you didn't know, takes a ton of energy), you can't actually make very much of it because you're limited by the kettles you have available, and it takes up a lot of space and weight for how much nutrients and calories it has.

All things considered, soup is actually pretty terrible choice of food for a small party that has to stay mobile.
>>
>>52963497
Oh, and soup doesn't keep well, either. Good luck trying to stop it from spoiling without refrigeration or canning process.
>>
>>52963497
What you want is "portable soup", which is basically a stable not!roux. Still takes a lot of energy to heat up the water but you can make it in personal portions and it helpfully contains lots of salt (which you need on the march).
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>>52950164
>>Food for Thought
>Most unusual in both its look and appearance, this dish is in fact a book enchanted with magic. The passages of this book describe in great detail a certain dish, from its ingredients down to the nuances of its taste. While reading this book, one actually feels this taste in his mouth and begins feeling satiation. By the time he finishes the book, he should be full. The book can be re-read any number of times, with the same effect. Every material used to make this book, from the pages to the ink, is edible, so the book can be eaten traditionally as well.
Fuck you this is mine now.
>>
>>52963540
That's much better than trying to make soup from ingredients you've foraged, but even then you would generally prefer things that can either be cooked quickly or eaten without heating if necessary.

>it helpfully contains lots of salt (which you need on the march).
Your diet is going to include lots of salt anyway, since salting is one of the main methods of preserving food that is available, so any meat you have is going to be either salted, salted and dried, or smoked.
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>>52911245
Playing The One Ring, so fare is pretty goddamn boring unless you're a Hobbit, an elf living specifically in Imladris, or one of the Barding-folk or Lake-men.
An early 11th century technological base doesn't allow for much variety.
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>>52963696
>lotr
>early 11th century
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>>52963009
MAGIC
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>>52963009
>literally eating fire is fine
>but getting fed by reading a book is ridiculous
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>>52963497
One thing you aren't accounting for is ease of digestion. A low boil over a long time breaks down the cell walls in the food and weakens connective tissue. This makes the chemical energy more accessible for less effort on the bodys part.
As to >>52963528 if one heats the pot every evening it kills most the bacteria and mold allowing for the stew to last a few days at least.
The best part about stew is that tough dry meat, boring unappealing vegetables, herbs, tubers and spices come together to make a hot hearty meal that'll warm your bones after a hard days work. For adventurers another boon is that one only need carry the dry ingredients, lightening the load.
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>>52970342
No, soup is still terrible for staying mobile.
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>>52940882
Yeah, I am certain mountain dwarves keep goats and grow barley for malted beer.
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>>52939542

Rothe

Duh
>>
Man I don't even know. Don't know the climate, don't know the topography, and I don't have what it takes to put all of this together.

How do you do it, /tg/? Just how do you do it?
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>>52972945

Aut... I mean, seriously, a setting doesn't grow overnight, at least not one with this level of detail in everything. It's a work that takes its time.
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>>52972945
We have no lives.
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>>52972945
Don't be an autist, use imagination in place of real world references.
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>>52972945
>>52973177
>>52973185
This pretty much, but there are some things you can keep in mind that can help you to come up with things.

One: Know your constraints.
Ideas form better when you shape them around a kernel of truth. For example, if I asked you right now to: "come up with an interesting food", your mind would scramble aimlessly and get nowhere, no one can just come up with things like that on the fly. However if I asked you: "come up with an interesting food, and it has to be made by a mountainous people, and the technology level is around the 10th century, and the food has to be easily stored," then you have a few things to work off of and ideas can form around that. So my first advice to coming up with new things is to just make a statement that can't be changed, and then work off of that.

Two: Ask a web of questions.
But let's say now that you don't even know what you should be creating. Like for example, how does someone remember to write down their fantasy city's tax plan? Well we can go back to tip one and use that for help. Let's say we want to design a new city, first we start with something really simple: it's in a mountain. Then from there we start asking questions based around that one statement: how do they farm on a mountain, what building materials do they make their homes out of, where does their fuel come from? Note that these are very basic questions, right now we just want to know how this mountain city physically manages to exist and sustain life. Next we ask bigger questions based on those answers: if they farm x, how big a population can they sustain? If they build their houses out of x, how good is their defenses? If it takes them x amount of time to get fuel, how strong is their industry? Then you ask more questions based off of those and you can continue ad infinitum until you're satisfied with your city.
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>>52974024

I'll add something that not everyone will agree on, but:

Worldbuild with your players. There is no one that will be more invested in that shit (usually, at least) and it's the DEFINITIVE way to make them interested in the game.
>>
>Manberries
Also known as the Manbaca, the Manberry is a smallish type of fruit produced by a cousin of the Mandrake, resembling a mixture between a yellow strawberry and a pudgy humanoid. It has no eyes, ears or nose, but it does have a mouth. Undisturbed, they sit upon the leaves of their mother plant, attached to it via a stalk upon their head. However, when their stalk is severed, they immediately begin to scream, seemingly panicked. This scream is considered highly unpleasant by most animals. They hit the ground running, scampering off into the undergrowth, usually escaping their hunter to burrow into the ground and grow into their mature form.

Unlike the fruit of Mandrakes, Manberries are not poisonous, and pleasantly sweet and refreshing. As such, during the warmer months in which they grow, serfs can be found wandering the woods, looking for Manberry plants, for a manifold of reasons. Unlike animals, humans do not find Manberry screams to be painful. In fact, many find it rather comical. Children and adults alike find great amusement in plucking all the fruits off of a Manberry plant and chasing them about before either popping them in their mouth or stuffing them in their pockets for a later snack. Bored peasants are also known to prank their friends with them or make them scream in front of cows or dogs and watch the poor animal go bananas. Manberries are also an aphrodisiac, can ward off evil and overripe Manberries are hallucinogenics (as well as a narcotic). Their name too, is a source of great amusement to children and particularly immature individuals.
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>>52977360
>Manberries
Hehehe.
>>
How about some pictures for inspiration?
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>>52940882
There's an archived thread about possible subterranian ecosystems, which got your carbs covered:
http://suptg.thisisnotatrueending.com/archive/40202533/#p40209777




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